TED talks: Visualizing Medical Data

Visualizing the medical data explosinAnders Ynnerman, PhD, studies computer graphics and scientific visualization, with a particular interest in medical imaging.  His 16-minute presentation at TEDxGoteborg 2010 highlights new tools and developing medical technologies.

Anders Ynnerman: Visualizing the medical data explosion

 

NYU Health Sciences Library implements Twitter

Laika’s Blog summarizes an article from Medical Reference Services Quarterly detailing New York University Health Sciences Library’s implementation of Twitter, Facebook, and a library blog “to give users as many options as possible to keep current with library news, resources, and services.” The article includes a flowchart illustrating how information created in one of these sources flows to the others without duplicating effort.  A free companion program, CoTwitter, is also described; CoTwitter allows the workload of creating “tweets” to be shared among the staff.

Cuddy, Colleen , Graham, Jamie and Morton-Owens, Emily G. (2010) Implementing Twitter in a Health Sciences Library. Medical Reference Services Quarterly 29(4): 320 — 330
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2010.518915

The Google Connection

 Well, I’m geeked. 

I read in the December CCL Outlook  that Proquest and Ebsco have entered a relationship with Google Scholar that allows libraries to set up links from Google Scholar results page to the fulltext found in their databases.  The enduser uses the “Scholar preferences” link in the upper right corner of the Scholar search screen , searches for his or her library name(s) in the “Library Links” section in the middle of the page, and selects the resources available.  Save preferences, and it’s good to go. 

Looks like I have some behind-the-scenes work to do, to get this set up for my patrons; I found my Proquest but not my Ebsco databases.  I also found one of the statewide Gale subscriptions, which seems to work perfectly well.

I work in a tiny hospital library.  High-end link resolvers and meta-search engines aren’t in my budget; so any time I can link fulltext to search results on the cheap, I’m a happy camper. 

CCL Outlook also reports on a couple of free tutorials:

  • 20 things I learned about the web , an interactive ebook explaining concepts such as “what is a browser?”, Javascript, TCP/IP, and cloud computing. Requires a browser that can handle HTML5; that rules out my hospital PC!
  • Google Search Manual at the Google Tutor blog, providing “tutorials, tips and advice for Google users.

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is doing awesome!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 6,400 times in 2010. That’s about 15 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 22 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 201 posts.

The busiest day of the year was January 5th with 53 views. The most popular post that day was Medical & Science Cartoons.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were mhsla.org, en.search.wordpress.com, mycrazyreader.info, bigextracash.com, and twitter.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for science cartoons, library humor, humorous pictures, science cartoon, and mrsa cartoon.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Medical & Science Cartoons December 2007

2

Friday fun February 2008

3

SWOT analysis for Web 2.0 tools May 2008

4

Slide Sharing sites December 2007
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5

University of Michigan’s digital repository now available through PubMed December 2007
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