MedWorm: Medical RSS & Search Engine

MedWorm (www.medworm.com) is a medical RSS feed provider as well as a search engine built on data collected from RSS feeds.  From the description on MedWorm’s “About” page:

MedWorm collects updates from over 5000 authoritative data sources (growing each day) via RSS feeds. From the data collected, MedWorm provides new outgoing RSS feeds on various medical categories that you can subscribe to, via the free MedWorm online service, or another RSS reader of your choice, such as Bloglines, Newsgator, Google Reader or FeedDemon.

Search or browse the site for RSS feeds on medical discussions, consumer health news, medical conditions, cancers, infectious diseases, drugs, therapies, or vaccines; browse a directory of blogs by category or use a blog tag cloud to identify posts on popular topics. 

PubMed Saved Searches & Year-End-Processing

Ever wonder why your saved searches / RSS feed searches get a little funny about this time of year?

The latest NLM Technical Bulletin offers some tips for setting up saved searches to weather the year-end MeSH terminology changes. Check it out:
Skill Kit: The Effects of Year End Processing (YEP) on Saved Searches or RSS Feeds

Tips & tricks for productivity software

We aren’t quite “cubicle dwellers,” but most of us use Windows, Internet Explorer, and Microsoft Office daily.  For those of us who could use just a little help with these complex programs, CNet’s Peter O’Reilly offers Worker’s Edge, a blog of “tips and tricks for the cubicle-dweller.”

Topics include email, Microsoft Office, Windows, Internet, and Search tips.  The most recent post,  Put Microsoft Word’s  styles to good use,  instructs on setting up keyboard shortcuts and Word’s style feature to edit documents created by other people.

Open Access follow-up

Additional links relating to the previous story about University of Michigan’s institutional repository:

Deep Blue repository site at University of Michigan: deepblue.lib.umich.edu/index.jsp . This site includes a search feature as well as information about Deep Blue.

Announcement at Taubman library’s blog: http://mblog.lib.umich.edu/tmlnews/archives/2007/11/deep_blue_and_p.html

For an introduction to Open Access, see Peter Suber’s overview: http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm . Keep up with open access issues at his Open Access News: http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/fosblog.html

University of Michigan’s digital repository now available through PubMed

From MLA Focus:

Deep Blue and PubMed LinkOut: A Higher Profile for University of Michigan Research

Researchers who find articles by University of Michigan (UM) authors in PubMed can now directly-and for free-link to the full text using Deep Blue, UM’s digital repository, via PubMed’s LinkOut feature. Deep Blue is an online archive that preserves and provides access to UM intellectual and creative work. It is the first institutional repository to provide such links.

To see all the items in Deep Blue that are in PubMed, enter “loprovdeepblue [sb]” in the PubMed search box. At this posting, there are over 8,800 articles.


I don’t find a way to add the Deep Blue collection in the LinkOut submission utility, and I don’t see a “free full text” button on the abstracts. However, Deep Blue’s link icon can be added to a library’s shared MyNCBI account; use Configure > PubMed > LinkOut > Miscellaneous > MLibrary (Deep Blue) (DeepBlue).

Note: “MLA Focus”, in this case, is from the Medical Library Association

ISI Impact Factors

The Krafty Librarian posts about Problems with ISI’s Impact Factor Data. The editors of the Journal of Cell Biology and the Journal of Experimental Medicine have written an editorial reporting their inability to verify published impact factors using data provided by ISI, and they’re questioning the validity of the dataset.

Rossner M, Van Epps H, Hill H. Show me the data. J Cell Biol 2007; 179 (6): 1091-1092. Published online December 17 2007, doi:10.1083/jcb.200711140. http://www.jcb.org/cgi/content/full/179/6/1091

Slide Sharing sites

A few weeks ago, a physician asked me to find a slide-sharing website that he had heard about through word-of-mouth. I came up with Slideshare: www.slideshare.net .

I’ve just run across another: AuthorStream: www.authorstream.com . Like Slideshare, AuthorStream allows presenters to upload and share presentations. The site includes animated presentations and presentations with audio. However, downloading presentations is not currently supported.