The Google Connection

 Well, I’m geeked. 

I read in the December CCL Outlook  that Proquest and Ebsco have entered a relationship with Google Scholar that allows libraries to set up links from Google Scholar results page to the fulltext found in their databases.  The enduser uses the “Scholar preferences” link in the upper right corner of the Scholar search screen , searches for his or her library name(s) in the “Library Links” section in the middle of the page, and selects the resources available.  Save preferences, and it’s good to go. 

Looks like I have some behind-the-scenes work to do, to get this set up for my patrons; I found my Proquest but not my Ebsco databases.  I also found one of the statewide Gale subscriptions, which seems to work perfectly well.

I work in a tiny hospital library.  High-end link resolvers and meta-search engines aren’t in my budget; so any time I can link fulltext to search results on the cheap, I’m a happy camper. 

CCL Outlook also reports on a couple of free tutorials:

  • 20 things I learned about the web , an interactive ebook explaining concepts such as “what is a browser?”, Javascript, TCP/IP, and cloud computing. Requires a browser that can handle HTML5; that rules out my hospital PC!
  • Google Search Manual at the Google Tutor blog, providing “tutorials, tips and advice for Google users.

CINAHL Clinical Queries now available

Press release from EBSCO:

In response to customer feedback, and through collaboration with
McMaster University, the EBSCOhost versions of CINAHL, CINAHL
Plus, CINAHL with Full Text, and CINAHL Plus with Full Text now
offer the ability to employ Clinical Queries as part of any search.

Clinical Queries, designed for clinician use, allow users to limit
searches with specific search strategies, to aid in retrieving
scientifically sound and clinically relevant study reports indexed
in CINAHL databases. Searches can be refined using specific search
strategies designed to produce results in five research areas:

  • Therapy – High Sensitivity
  • Prognosis
  • Review
  • Qualitative
  • Causation (Etiology)

As research may require different emphasis, three strategies are provided for each area.

  • High Sensitivity is the broadest search, to include ALL relevant material. It may also include less relevant materials.
  • High Specificity is the most targeted search to include only the most relevant result set, may miss some relevant materials.
  • Best Balance retrieves the best balance between Sensitivity and Specificity.

Please visit EBSCO’s Support Site (http://support.ebsco.com) to learn about all of EBSCO’s products, search among thousands of FAQs, download Flash tutorials, Help Sheets or User Guides, or communicate with EBSCO’s Technical Support Representatives online, via EBSCO’s Support Form, or by telephone:

In the United States and Canada:(800) 758-5995
Outside of the United States and Canada: access code, (800) 3272-6000

Sincerely,

Marcie Brown
Technical Communications Manager
EBSCO Publishing
10 Estes Street
Ipswich, MA01938